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5 Things That Make a Bad Spa Menu


In a previous blog post we discussed some things that make for a great spa menu. We think you'll agree that your treatment menu is more than just a brochure or page on your website - it establishes a connection between you and your client. Here are 5 things we believe you should be sure you don't do when designing your menu.


1. Leave Out Pricing. There is a school of thought that advises leaving pricing off the spa menu to avoid having to print updated menus periodically. Don’t do it! Leaving out pricing may result in lost sales. Most prospective clients want to know what they are paying for, and if they can’t find it easily, they will go somewhere else. Stay away from discount-appearing prices that end in fractions ($89.79, for example) and round up to the nearest whole number.


2. Going overboard with formatting and forgetting to proofread. Your choice of fonts and theme colors is very important in branding you and your spa. Stay away from over the top or whimsical fonts that are hard to read or make you look like you are playing at running a business. A touch of whimsy is great, if it truly represents who you are and what you are trying to project.


Profread, Proofreed, Proofread. Misspelled words and grammatical errors may cause clients to wonder what else you’re careless about or whether you really care about delivering quality service. Use another pair of eyes if necessary to check your work. Don’t rely solely on software spellcheck - it doesn’t correct all errors.


3. Not including your spa policies. Are your booking and cancellation policies detailed and very clear? What about COVID-19 policies? Devote a separate space to these on your menu, preferably at the end.


4. Making it all about you instead of them. Keep the words “our”, “my” and “mine” to a minimum or better yet, not at all. Make it all about the client (“you”, “yours”).


5. Offering Too Much. It’s nice to offer your clients an option or add on for their facials, but don’t give away the store. Remember this basic rule of marketing: a confused mind walks away. You don’t want your client to be so overwhelmed with choices that you lose them. Consider your niche market. Who are they and what treatments do they love, have asked for or purchased? Adding treatments because they are popular or you’ve seen them on other esthetician menus, or "just because" will take you off brand (your unique brand ME) and you’ll be overhauling your menu down the road to get it back on track.